Venous Interventions

Diseases of the veins are extremely common and result from poorly functioning valves in these veins that ensure blood returns from the legs back to the heart. This causes blood to pool in the legs under higher pressure than normal, causing varicose veins (unsightly large veins), swelling of the legs especially at the end of the day or after a flight, dark pigmentation and itching in the legs and in severe cases ulcers (wounds) in the legs around the ankle that are difficult to heal.

We offer a complete range of solutions for the diagnosis and treatment of venous disease which can be combined depending on what may be right for an individual patient.

This procedure may be done under a local or general anaesthetic and is used for treatment of varicose veins where the poorly functioning valves are mainly above the knee area under the guidance of an ultrasound scan. The diseased vein is treated with a thin plastic catheter (tube) that can generated radiofrequency waves. These heat the wall of the diseased vein causing it to close, thereby moving the blood from the diseased vein into the many good veins within the patient’s leg.

This procedure may be done under a local or general anaesthetic and is used for treatment of varicose veins where the poorly functioning valves are mainly below the knee area under the guidance of an ultrasound scan. The diseased vein is treated with a hollow plastic catheter (tube) that can be used to inject a sclerosant (a drug that causes the diseased vein to get scarred and close). A wire tip on the tube vibrates to damage the inside lining of the diseased vein, improving the effect of the sclerosant drug on the on for a better result.

This procedure may be done under a local or general anaesthetic and is used for treatment of varicose veins where the poorly functioning valves are above and below the knee i.e across the whole length of the leg, under the guidance of an ultrasound scan. The diseased vein is treated with a special medical grade glue similar to super glue that sticks the walls of the diseased vein together, causing it to close.

Small segments of diseased unsightly varicose veins are treated by this method either alone or in combination with another method for larger segments of diseased veins. It may be done under local or general anaesthetic and involves creation of small needle holes above the unsightly veins through which the unsightly veins are removed

This method is used to treat any unsightly veins or spider veins that may remain or sometimes new veins that may appear after the initial treatment. A sclerosant (a drug that causes the diseased vein to get scarred and close) is mixed with air to create a foam that is then injected to close the diseased vein under local anaesthesia. Alternatively dilute sclerosant is injected through very fine needles to get rid of unsightly spider veins (microsclerotherapy).

This method is used in patients who develop ulcers in the skin due to excessively high pressure from the diseased vein. These ulcers are around the ankle and closing the diseased vein under the ulcer with a special medical grade glue (Venaseal glue) along with appropriate compression bandages has been shown to lead to rapid healing of the ulcers.

In some patients, the high pressure in the veins in their leg is due to the iliac vein (the large vein draining blood from the leg and located just above the groin crease) being pressed upon in the pelvis by an overlying artery. This leads to significant symptoms ranging from varicose veins, swollen legs with itchy weepy skin at the ankles, pelvic congestion (painful menses, heavy bleeding and painful intercourse) to leg ulcers.

This is diagnosed by a combination of tests and treated by using a metal stent to relieve the pressure with ultrasound guidance from within the vein.