CORONARY CALCIUM SCORE

Coronary Calcium Score

The Coronary Calcium Score may be used as a screening tool to evaluate the risk for future coronary artery disease. Essentially, more coronary calcium means more coronary artery plaque, suggesting a greater likelihood of significant narrowing in the coronary arteries and a higher risk of future cardiovascular events.

The preparation for a calcium score is identical to that for a cardiac CT angiogram. The CT scan captures multiple images of the heart synchronized with the patient’s heartbeat. A computer program calculates the amount and distribution of calcium in the coronary arteries. The score will be evaluated alongside other risk factors and facilitate recommendations regarding your lifestyle, medications or additional cardiac testing from your cardiologist. The procedure only takes a few minutes and the radiation risk is comparable to that of a plain X-Ray.

Coronary Calcium Score
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